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Atmospheric Corrections Using MODTRAN for TOA and Surface BRDF Characteristics from High Resolution Spectroradiometric/Angular Measurements from a Helicopter Platform


doi: 10.1007/BF03403518

  • High-resolution spectral radiance measurements were taken by a spectral radiometer on board a heli copter over the US Oklahoma Southern Great Plain near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site during August 1998. The radiometer has a spectral range from 350 nm to 2500 nm at 1 nm resolution. The measurements covered several grass and cropland scene types at multiple solar zenith angles. Detailed atmospheric corrections using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance (MODTRAN) radiation model and in-situ sounding and aerosol measurements have been applied to the helicopter measurements in order to re trieve the surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) characteristics. The atmospheric corrections are most significant in the visible wavelengths and in the strong water vapor absorption wavelengths in the near infrared region. Adjusting the BRDF to TOA requires a larger correction in the visible channels since Rayleigh scattering contributes significantly to the TOA reflectance. The opposite corrections to the visible and near infrarred wavelengths can alter the radiance dif ference and ratio that many remote sensing techniques are based on, such as the normalized difference vege tation index (NDVI). The data show that surface BRDFs and spectral albedos are highly sensitive to the veg etation type and solar zenith angle while BRDF at TOA depends more on atmospheric conditions and the vi ewing geometry. Comparison with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) derived clear sky Angular Distribution Model (ADM) for crop and grass scene type shows a standard deviation of 0.08 in broadband anisotropic function at 25 solar zenith angle and 0.15 at 50 solar zenith angle, respectively.
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Manuscript History

Manuscript received: 10 September 2001
Manuscript revised: 10 September 2001
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
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    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

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Atmospheric Corrections Using MODTRAN for TOA and Surface BRDF Characteristics from High Resolution Spectroradiometric/Angular Measurements from a Helicopter Platform

  • 1. Corresponding author address: Dr. Yaping Zhou, Analysis Branch, Climate Pre.diction Center, NCEP/NWS / NOAA, WWB, 5200 Auth Road Camp Springs, MD 20746-4304,Analytical Service & Material, Inc, Hampton, VA, USA,Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, USA,Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA,Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA

Abstract: High-resolution spectral radiance measurements were taken by a spectral radiometer on board a heli copter over the US Oklahoma Southern Great Plain near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site during August 1998. The radiometer has a spectral range from 350 nm to 2500 nm at 1 nm resolution. The measurements covered several grass and cropland scene types at multiple solar zenith angles. Detailed atmospheric corrections using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance (MODTRAN) radiation model and in-situ sounding and aerosol measurements have been applied to the helicopter measurements in order to re trieve the surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) characteristics. The atmospheric corrections are most significant in the visible wavelengths and in the strong water vapor absorption wavelengths in the near infrared region. Adjusting the BRDF to TOA requires a larger correction in the visible channels since Rayleigh scattering contributes significantly to the TOA reflectance. The opposite corrections to the visible and near infrarred wavelengths can alter the radiance dif ference and ratio that many remote sensing techniques are based on, such as the normalized difference vege tation index (NDVI). The data show that surface BRDFs and spectral albedos are highly sensitive to the veg etation type and solar zenith angle while BRDF at TOA depends more on atmospheric conditions and the vi ewing geometry. Comparison with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) derived clear sky Angular Distribution Model (ADM) for crop and grass scene type shows a standard deviation of 0.08 in broadband anisotropic function at 25 solar zenith angle and 0.15 at 50 solar zenith angle, respectively.

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