Advanced Search
Article Contents

Trends of Temperature Extremes in China and its Relationship with Global temperature anomalies Relationship with Global Temperature Anomalies


doi: 10.1007/s00376-009-9085-4

  • Changes of temperature extremes over China were evaluated using daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 591 stations for the period 1961--2002. A set of indices of warm extremes, cold extremes and daily temperature range (DTR) extremes was studied with a focus on trends. The results showed that the frequency of warm extremes (F_WE) increased obviously in most parts of China, and the intensity of warm extremes (I_WE) increased significantly in northern China. The opposite distribution was found in the frequency and intensity of cold extremes. The frequency of high DTR extremes was relatively uniform with that of intensity: an obvious increasing trend was located over western China and the east coast, while significant decreases occurred in central, southeastern and northeastern China; the opposite distribution was found for low DTR extreme days. Seasonal trends illustrated that both F_WE and I_WE showed significant increasing trends, especially over northeastern China and along the Yangtze Valley basin in spring and winter. A correlation technique was used to link extreme temperature anomalies over China with global temperature anomalies. Three key regions were identified, as follows: northeastern China and its coastal areas, the high-latitude regions above 40oN, and southwestern China and the equatorial eastern Pacific.
  • [1] Buwen DONG, Rowan T. SUTTON, Wei CHEN, Xiaodong LIU, Riyu LU, Ying SUN, 2016: Abrupt Summer Warming and Changes in Temperature Extremes over Northeast Asia Since the Mid-1990s: Drivers and Physical Processes, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 33, 1005-1023.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-016-5247-3
    [2] DONG Siyan, XU Ying, ZHOU Botao, SHI Ying, 2015: Assessment of Indices of Temperature Extremes Simulated by Multiple CMIP5 Models over China, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 32, 1077-1091.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-015-4152-5
    [3] Ahmad Norazhar Mohd YATIM, Mohd Talib LATIF, Fatimah AHAMAD, Md Firoz KHAN, Mohd Shahrul Mohd NADZIR, Liew JUNENG, 2019: Observed Trends in Extreme Temperature over the Klang Valley, Malaysia, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 36, 1355-1370.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-019-9075-0
    [4] YAN Zhongwei, XIA Jiangjiang, QIAN Cheng, ZHOU Wen, 2011: Changes in Seasonal Cycle and Extremes in China during the Period 1960--2008, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 28, 269-283.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-010-0006-3
    [5] Bo SUN, Huijun WANG, 2017: A Trend towards a Stable Warm and Windless State of the Surface Weather Conditions in Northern and Northeastern China during 1961-2014, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 34, 713-726.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-017-6252-x
    [6] Bian Jianchun, Chen Hongbin, Zhao Yanliang, Lü Daren, 2002: Variation Features of Total Atmospheric Ozone in Beijing and Kunming Based on Dobson and TOMS Data, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 19, 279-286.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-002-0022-z
    [7] CAO Ning, REN Baohua, ZHENG Jianqiu, 2015: Evaluation of CMIP5 Climate Models in Simulating 1979-2005 Oceanic Latent Heat Flux over the Pacific, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 32, 1603-1616.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-015-5016-8
    [8] Bo SUN, 2018: Asymmetric Variations in the Tropical Ascending Branches of Hadley Circulations and the Associated Mechanisms and Effects, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 35, 317-333.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-017-7089-z
    [9] NIE Suping, LUO Yong, ZHU Jiang, 2008: Trends and Scales of Observed Soil Moisture Variations in China, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 25, 43-58.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-008-0043-3
    [10] Pucai WANG, N. F. ELANSKY, Yu. M. TIMOFEEV, Gengchen WANG, G. S. GOLITSYN, M. V. MAKAROVA, V. S. RAKITIN, Yu. SHTABKIN, A. I. SKOROKHOD, E. I. GRECHKO, E.V. FOKEEVA, A. N. SAFRONOV, Liang RAN, Ting WANG, 2018: Long-Term Trends of Carbon Monoxide Total Columnar Amount in Urban Areas and Background Regions: Ground- and Satellite-based Spectroscopic Measurements, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 35, 785-795.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-017-6327-8
    [11] Wai-Ming TO, Tat-Wai YU, 2016: Characterizing the Urban Temperature Trend Using Seasonal Unit Root Analysis: Hong Kong from 1970 to 2015, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 33, 1376-1385.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-016-6113-z
    [12] FAN Lijun, Deliang CHEN, FU Congbin, YAN Zhongwei, 2013: Statistical downscaling of summer temperature extremes in northern China, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 30, 1085-1095.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-012-2057-0
    [13] QIAN Cheng, YAN Zhongwei, Zhaohua WU, FU Congbin, TU Kai, 2011: Trends in Temperature Extremes in Association with Weather-Intraseasonal Fluctuations in Eastern China, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 28, 297-309.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-010-9242-9
    [14] Julian X.L. Wang, Dian J. Gaffen, 2001: Trends in Extremes of Surface Humidity, Temperature, and Summertime Heat Stress in China, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 18, 742-751.
    [15] Xianghui KONG, Aihui WANG, Xunqiang BI, Dan WANG, 2019: Assessment of Temperature Extremes in China Using RegCM4 and WRF, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 36, 363-377.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-018-8144-0
    [16] S. S. Dugam, S. B. Kakade, R. K. Verma, 1990: Global Annual Mean Surface Air Temperature Anomalies and Their Link with Indian Summer Monsoon Failures, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 7, 245-248.  doi: 10.1007/BF02919162
    [17] Fu Congbin, 1993: An Aridity Trend in China and Its Abrupt Feature in Association with the Global Warming, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 10, 11-20.  doi: 10.1007/BF02656950
    [18] WEN Lijuan, Nidhi NAGABHATLA, Lü Shihua, Shih-Yu WANG, 2013: Impact of Rain Snow Threshold Temperature on Snow Depth Simulation in Land Surface and Regional Atmospheric Models, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 30, 1449-1460.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-012-2192-7
    [19] XU Ying, GAO Xuejie, SHEN Yan, XU Chonghai, SHI Ying, F. GIORGI, 2009: A Daily Temperature Dataset over China and Its Application in Validating a RCM Simulation, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 26, 763-772.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-009-9029-z
    [20] HU Yichang, HE Yong, DONG Wenjie, 2009: Changes in Temperature Extremes Based on a 6-Hourly Dataset in China from 1961--2005, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 26, 1215-1225.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-009-8140-5

Get Citation+

Export:  

Share Article

Manuscript History

Manuscript received: 10 July 2010
Manuscript revised: 10 July 2010
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Trends of Temperature Extremes in China and its Relationship with Global temperature anomalies Relationship with Global Temperature Anomalies

  • 1. Institute of Severe Weather & Climate, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093,Institute of Severe Weather & Climate, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093,Institute of Severe Weather & Climate, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093

Abstract: Changes of temperature extremes over China were evaluated using daily maximum and minimum temperature data from 591 stations for the period 1961--2002. A set of indices of warm extremes, cold extremes and daily temperature range (DTR) extremes was studied with a focus on trends. The results showed that the frequency of warm extremes (F_WE) increased obviously in most parts of China, and the intensity of warm extremes (I_WE) increased significantly in northern China. The opposite distribution was found in the frequency and intensity of cold extremes. The frequency of high DTR extremes was relatively uniform with that of intensity: an obvious increasing trend was located over western China and the east coast, while significant decreases occurred in central, southeastern and northeastern China; the opposite distribution was found for low DTR extreme days. Seasonal trends illustrated that both F_WE and I_WE showed significant increasing trends, especially over northeastern China and along the Yangtze Valley basin in spring and winter. A correlation technique was used to link extreme temperature anomalies over China with global temperature anomalies. Three key regions were identified, as follows: northeastern China and its coastal areas, the high-latitude regions above 40oN, and southwestern China and the equatorial eastern Pacific.

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return