Advanced Search
Article Contents

A Modeling Study of Seasonal Variation of Atmospheric Aerosols over East Asia


doi: 10.1007/s00376-011-0234-1

  • In this study, a regional air quality model system (RAQMS) was applied to investigate the spatial distributions and seasonal variations of atmospheric aerosols in 2006 over East Asia. Model validations demonstrated that RAQMS was able to reproduce the evolution processes of aerosol components reasonably well. Ground-level PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) concentrations were highest in spring and lowest in summer and were characterized by three maximum centers: the Taklimakan Desert (~1000 μg m-3), the Gobi Desert (~400 μg m-3), and the Huabei Plain (~300 μm-3) of China. Vertically, high PM10 concentrations ranging from 100 μg m-3 to 250 μg m-3 occurred from the surface to an altitude of 6000 m at 30o--45oN in spring. In winter, the vertical gradient was so large that most aerosols were restricted in the boundary layer. Both sulfate and ammonium reached their highest concentrations in autumn, while nitrate reached its maximum level in winter. Black carbon and organic carbon aerosol concentrations reached maximums in winter. Soil dust were strongest in spring, whereas sea salt exerted the strongest influence on the coastal regions of eastern China in summer. The estimated burden of anthropogenic aerosols was largest in winter (1621 Gg) and smallest in summer (1040 Gg). The sulfate burden accounted for ~42% of the total anthropogenic aerosol burden. The dust burden was about twice the anthropogenic aerosol burden, implying the potentially important impacts of the natural aerosols on air quality and climate over East Asia.
  • [1] ZHANG Dingyuan, LIAO Hong, WANG Yuesi, 2014: Simulated Spatial Distribution and Seasonal Variation of Atmospheric Methane over China: Contributions from Key Sources, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 31, 283-292.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-013-3018-y
    [2] Wang Zifa, Huang Meiyuan, He Dongyang, Xu Huaying, Zhou Ling, 1996: Sulfur Distribution and Transport Studies in East Asia Using Eulerian Model, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 13, 399-409.  doi: 10.1007/BF02656856
    [3] GAO Lijie, ZHANG Meigen, HAN Zhiwei, 2009: Model Analysis of Seasonal Variations in Tropospheric Ozone and Carbon Monoxide over East Asia, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 26, 312-318.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-009-0312-9
    [4] Long WEN, Kun ZHAO, Mengyao WANG, Guifu ZHANG, 2019: Seasonal Variations of Observed Raindrop Size Distribution in East China, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 36, 346-362.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-018-8107-5
    [5] Jieshun ZHU, Entcho DEMIROV, Ying ZHANG, and Ania POLOMSKA-HARLICK, 2014: Model Simulations of Mesoscale Eddies and Deep Convection in the Labrador Sea, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 31, 743-754.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-013-3107-y
    [6] Qian Yongfu, Zhang Qiong, Yao Yonghong, Zhang Xuehong, 2002: Seasonal Variation and Heat Preference of the South Asia High, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 19, 821-836.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-002-0047-3
    [7] LIU Qianxia, ZHANG Meigen, WANG Bin, 2005: Simulation of Tropospheric Ozone with MOZART-2:An Evaluation Study over East Asia, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 22, 585-594.  doi: 10.1007/BF02918490
    [8] Samuel Takele KENEA, Young-Suk OH, Jae-Sang RHEE, Tae-Young GOO, Young-Hwa BYUN, Shanlan LI, Lev D. LABZOVSKII, Haeyoung LEE, Robert F. BANKS, 2019: Evaluation of Simulated CO2 Concentrations from the CarbonTracker-Asia Model Using In-situ Observations over East Asia for 2009-2013, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 36, 603-613.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-019-8150-x
    [9] Gong-Wang Si, Kuranoshin Kato, Takao Takeda, 1995: The Early Summer Seasonal Change of Large-scale Circulation over East Asia and Its Relation to Change of The Frontal Features and Frontal Rainfall Environment During 1991 Summer, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 12, 151-176.  doi: 10.1007/BF02656829
    [10] KUANG Xueyuan, ZHANG Yaocun, 2005: Seasonal Variation of the East Asian Subtropical Westerly Jet and Its Association with the Heating Field over East Asia, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 22, 831-840.  doi: 10.1007/BF02918683
    [11] Guo Yufu, Yu Yongqiang, Liu Xiying, Zhang Xuehong, 2001: Simulation of Climate Change Induced by CO2 Increasing for East Asia with IAP/LASG GOALS Model, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 18, 53-66.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-001-0004-6
    [12] Wei CHEN, Xiaowei HONG, Riyu LU, Aifen JIN, Shizhu JIN, Jae-Cheol NAM, Jin-Ho SHIN, Tae-Young GOO, Baek-Jo KIM, 2016: Variation in Summer Surface Air Temperature over Northeast Asia and Its Associated Circulation Anomalies, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 33, 1-9.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-015-5056-0
    [13] Seung-Jae LEE, E. Hugo BERBERY, Domingo ALCARAZ-SEGURA, 2013: The Impact of Ecosystem Functional Type Changes on the La Plata Basin Climate, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 30, 1387-1405.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-012-2149-x
    [14] WANG Zaizhi, WU Guoxiong, WU Tongwen, YU Rucong, 2004: Simulation of Asian Monsoon Seasonal Variations with Climate Model R42L9/LASG, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 21, 879-889.  doi: 10.1007/BF02915590
    [15] ZHANG Xinping, LIU Jingmiao, HE Yuanqing, TIAN Lide, YAO Tandong, 2005: Humidity Effect and Its Influence on the Seasonal Distribution of Precipitation δ18O in Monsoon Regions, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 22, 271-277.  doi: 10.1007/BF02918516
    [16] KOU Xingxia, ZHANG Meigen, PENG Zhen, WANG Yinghong, 2015: Assessment of the Biospheric Contribution to Surface Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations over East Asia with a Regional Chemical Transport Model, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 32, 287-300.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-014-4059-6
    [17] Yuhan YAN, Chaofan LI, Riyu LU, 2019: Meridional Displacement of the East Asian Upper-tropospheric Westerly Jet and Its Relationship with the East Asian Summer Rainfall in CMIP5 Simulations, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 36, 1203-1216.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-019-9066-1
    [18] LIU Xiangcui, LIU Hailong, 2014: Heat Budget of the South-Central Equatorial Pacific in CMIP3 Models, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 31, 669-680.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-013-2299-5
    [19] Yongguang ZHENG, Ming XUE, Bo LI, Jiong CHEN, Zuyu TAO, 2016: Spatial Characteristics of Extreme Rainfall over China with Hourly through 24-Hour Accumulation Periods Based on National-Level Hourly Rain Gauge Data, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 33, 1218-1232.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-016-6128-5
    [20] WANG Xinmin, ZHAI Panmao, WANG Cuicui, 2009: Variations in Extratropical Cyclone Activity in Northern East Asia, ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 26, 471-479.  doi: 10.1007/s00376-009-0471-8

Get Citation+

Export:  

Share Article

Manuscript History

Manuscript received: 10 January 2012
Manuscript revised: 10 January 2012
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

A Modeling Study of Seasonal Variation of Atmospheric Aerosols over East Asia

  • 1. Key Laboratory of Regional Climate--Environment Research for Temperate East Asia, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029,Key Laboratory of Regional Climate--Environment Research for Temperate East Asia,Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029

Abstract: In this study, a regional air quality model system (RAQMS) was applied to investigate the spatial distributions and seasonal variations of atmospheric aerosols in 2006 over East Asia. Model validations demonstrated that RAQMS was able to reproduce the evolution processes of aerosol components reasonably well. Ground-level PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) concentrations were highest in spring and lowest in summer and were characterized by three maximum centers: the Taklimakan Desert (~1000 μg m-3), the Gobi Desert (~400 μg m-3), and the Huabei Plain (~300 μm-3) of China. Vertically, high PM10 concentrations ranging from 100 μg m-3 to 250 μg m-3 occurred from the surface to an altitude of 6000 m at 30o--45oN in spring. In winter, the vertical gradient was so large that most aerosols were restricted in the boundary layer. Both sulfate and ammonium reached their highest concentrations in autumn, while nitrate reached its maximum level in winter. Black carbon and organic carbon aerosol concentrations reached maximums in winter. Soil dust were strongest in spring, whereas sea salt exerted the strongest influence on the coastal regions of eastern China in summer. The estimated burden of anthropogenic aerosols was largest in winter (1621 Gg) and smallest in summer (1040 Gg). The sulfate burden accounted for ~42% of the total anthropogenic aerosol burden. The dust burden was about twice the anthropogenic aerosol burden, implying the potentially important impacts of the natural aerosols on air quality and climate over East Asia.

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return