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Model for Methane Emission from Rice Fields and Its Application in Southern China


doi: 10.1007/BF02656859

  • A process model has been developed. The model has been used to calculate the methane emission from rice fields. The influence of climate conditions, field water management, organic fertilizers and soil types on methane emission from rice fields are considered. There are three major segments which are highly interactive in nature in the model: rice growth, decomposition of soil organic matter and methane production, transport efficiency and methane emission rate. Explicit equations for modeling each segment mentioned above are given. The main results of the model are: 1. The seasonal variation of methane emission of the model output agrees with that of field experiments. The de-viation of seasonal average methane emission rate between modeled value and experimental data is about 10%. 2. In the whole rice growing period, model output is similar to experimental data in the seasonal variation of transport ability of rice plant. 3. Soil organic matter content and soil physics and chemistry are major factors that determine the total season average emission rate, while soil temperature controls the temporal variation of methane emission from rice fields.
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Manuscript History

Manuscript received: 10 April 1996
Manuscript revised: 10 April 1996
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
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    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

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Model for Methane Emission from Rice Fields and Its Application in Southern China

  • 1. Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029,Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029

Abstract: A process model has been developed. The model has been used to calculate the methane emission from rice fields. The influence of climate conditions, field water management, organic fertilizers and soil types on methane emission from rice fields are considered. There are three major segments which are highly interactive in nature in the model: rice growth, decomposition of soil organic matter and methane production, transport efficiency and methane emission rate. Explicit equations for modeling each segment mentioned above are given. The main results of the model are: 1. The seasonal variation of methane emission of the model output agrees with that of field experiments. The de-viation of seasonal average methane emission rate between modeled value and experimental data is about 10%. 2. In the whole rice growing period, model output is similar to experimental data in the seasonal variation of transport ability of rice plant. 3. Soil organic matter content and soil physics and chemistry are major factors that determine the total season average emission rate, while soil temperature controls the temporal variation of methane emission from rice fields.

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